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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 14  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 59-66

Rate of development of incisional hernia 1 year after urgent midline laparotomy


Department of General Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Aswan University, Aswan, Egypt

Correspondence Address:
Abd-El-Aal A Saleem
Department of General Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Aswan University, Aswan
Egypt
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1687-1693.192653

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Objective The aim of the present study was to determine the rate of development of incisional hernia at 6 months and 1 year in patients suffering from peritonitis (potentially septic wounds) and other patients suffering from intraperitoneal hemorrhage (IPHge) (aseptic wounds) who had undergone urgent midline laparotomy. In addition, we aimed to evaluate different surgical techniques and suture materials used for abdominal closure and the prevalence of postoperative complications among the studied groups in the Emergency Department of Aswan University Hospital, Egypt. Patients and methods This observational and descriptive study included evaluation and assessment of interviews of 160 patients divided into two groups (A and B). Group A included 80 patients suffering from peritonitis and group B included 80 patients suffering from IPHge. All patients submitted to the surgical treatment in the form of emergency exploratory laparotomy and evaluation of their medical records, involving different surgical techniques and suture materials used for abdominal closure. Postoperative follow-up was set at 6 months and 1 year for the development of incisional hernia. Results Analyses of 160 patients in the two groups indicated that the incisional hernia rate increased significantly from 7.5% at 6 months to 17.5% at 1 year after urgent midline laparotomy in all studied patients (P=0.007). There was a significant increase in incisional hernia rate in group A in comparison with group B at 6 months (12.5 vs. 2.5%; P=0.02) and at 1 year (25 vs. 10%; P=0.01) follow-up after urgent midline laparotomy. Regarding the techniques of closure of urgent midline laparotomy and the used suture materials (Vicryl and Prolene), there was an insignificant deference as regards the development of incisional hernia between subgroups A1 and A2 at 6 months (P=0.50) and at 1 year (P=0.30), and also between subgroups B1 and B2 at 6 months (P=0.49) and at 1 year (P=1.0) follow-up after urgent midline laparotomy. Conclusion The incisional hernia remains the most common complication after midline laparotomy, representing 7.5% at 6 months and 17.5% at 1 year follow-up in the present study. Incisional hernia was significantly increased in patients suffering from peritonitis than in those patients suffering from IPHge at 6 months and at 1 year after urgent midline laparotomy. Regarding the surgical techniques and suture materials used for closure of urgent midline laparotomy, there was an insignificant difference as regards the development of incisional hernia between closure of urgent midline incision by continuous suture plus some interrupted sutures in between using slowly absorbable multifilamentous suture material [Vicryl (polyglactin)] and continuous suture only using nonabsorbable monofilamentous suture material [Prolene (polypropylene)] at 6 months and 1 year between subgroups A1 and A2, and between B1 and B2.


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